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Travel advice videos

Click on a location on the map to watch the video with travel health care advice for that region of the world

WM Travel Clinic North America
WM Travel Clinic health advice for travelling to South America

When travelling from the UK to any part of Asia it is best to have your vaccination at least eight weeks before travelling. This is not always possible but in any event you should make sure that your existing vaccinations for the UK are up to date, such as Polio and Tetanus.

If they’re not, you should arrange booster jabs. Courses or boosters usually advised are diphtheria; tetanus; poliomyelitis; hepatitis A and typhoid. Depending on exactly where you intend to travel you may also need hepatitis B; rabies; cholera and Japanese encephalitis. Children over 6 months old coming from an area with risk of yellow fever transmission must have a yellow fever vaccination certificate. They are only exempt if under 6 months old and if the mother’s certificate shows that she was vaccinated before the birth of the child. You should carry all vaccination related documents with you when travelling in Asia. Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease transmitted by mosquitoes. It is wise to assume that you may be at risk of Malaria in any part of Asia especially Pakistan, India and the countries of South East Asia. You cannot be vaccinated against malaria. For exact details of high risk areas contact the West Midlands Travel Clinic Finally, there are vaccines required by special groups of people because of enhanced risk exposure or complications. For example: Hepatitis B for health care workers and Influenza and Pneumococcal vaccines for the elderly. For more information contact the West Midlands Travel Clinic Dr Prabhat Sood of the West Midlands Travel Clinic provides a consultant lead travel health service for advice on all of your travel healthcare needs. Dr Sood is a consultant physician and is qualified in travel medicine. He provides a level of travel healthcare not normally available at nurse lead travel clinics. For advice on your particular situation or to book an appointment – contact the West Midlands Travel Clinic.

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WM Travel Clinic Africa
West Midlands Travel – Europe & Russia
WM Travel Clinic health travel advice for travelling to Asia

When travelling from the UK to any part of Asia it is best to have your vaccination at least eight weeks before travelling. This is not always possible but in any event you should make sure that your existing vaccinations for the UK are up to date, such as Polio and Tetanus. If they’re not, you should arrange booster jabs.

Courses or boosters usually advised are diphtheria; tetanus; poliomyelitis; hepatitis A and typhoid. Depending on exactly where you intend to travel you may also need hepatitis B; rabies; cholera and Japanese encephalitis. Children over 6 months old coming from an area with risk of yellow fever transmission must have a yellow fever vaccination certificate. They are only exempt if under 6 months old and if the mother’s certificate shows that she was vaccinated before the birth of the child. You should carry all vaccination related documents with you when travelling in Asia. Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease transmitted by mosquitoes. It is wise to assume that you may be at risk of Malaria in any part of Asia especially Pakistan, India and the countries of South East Asia. You cannot be vaccinated against malaria. For exact details of high risk areas contact the West Midlands Travel Clinic Finally, there are vaccines required by special groups of people because of enhanced risk exposure or complications. For example: Hepatitis B for health care workers and Influenza and Pneumococcal vaccines for the elderly. For more information contact the West Midlands Travel Clinic Dr Prabhat Sood of the West Midlands Travel Clinic provides a consultant lead travel

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WM Travel Clinic Australia and New Zealand